Bill's Tips: How To Cut Someone Off


by Michael Garrison

Ah the annoying customer. the real reason we are all ninjas behind the wood so we can unleash a flurry of bad ass ninjitsu on his irritating, opinionated dumb ass as we keep the drinks flowing and the fun going! lol...Ok we can’t really slap down some ass clown even though a lot of the times we really want to but dealing with the customer that has reached the point where he or she has got ta go is quite an art form in this business.

The simplest and generally the most rewarding way is to be so nice it is almost sickening. When you are all smiles and laughing but polite and guiding the customer has no real choice but to go with the flow. The best "cut offs" and walk outs start with just being honest and leaving no room for negotiation. Always know someone's name before you push them on the exit path. It gives you more credit with them and their friends and establishes you are not some jerk ending the fun you are just the guy or gal who is doing there job and being responsible.

For example: "Cameron buddy i think your time at our fine establishment is coming to an end(place laugh here)you have a ride home or should I call your parole officer....again?(hit up another laugh and grin and wait for the reply).

What I am doing in that scenario is not taking myself too seriously and giving the customer a chance to go along with the positive flow and leave on a laugh knowing we all had to fun and it is just time to go now. Most of the time the patron will get the hint, exit shortly and even tip big because of the Bar Ninja mind trick. Always keeping it light and using humor will keep everyone comfortable and set the tone for a fun bar.

Always set a good example with the customer who is leaving and all the remaining patrons we recognize your leadership skills, drink merrily and I promise no ninjas were hurt in the writing of this article...ok..there was that one guy in the bar at charlotte..but he did ask for it :-) I'm just saying...




Michael Garrison
Michael Garrison

Author




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